China First Hand

Watchtower

 

 

Ancient civilisation to emerging superpower -

a unique comeback story is progressing now

 

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China holds near a quarter of the world population. Does it seem this significant? There are so many things us Westerners do not see. Perhaps our ignorance is due to the insular ruling of China? But if politics prevents us seeing them, then the reverse is certainly true. The Communist government carefully controls the people in China – information is not free, and mass-manipulation occurs constantly.

In many ways the West represents China’s polar opposite with democracy and freedom of speech contrasting the values currently dominant in the Middle Kingdom. However, since China opened her borders the Western influence is rapidly and increasingly visible. What will this lead to? Will the Chinese leaders sustain their power and succeed in becoming the most powerful people in the world? The future of the country – and the global impact this will have – depends on the changes happening now, in China.

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Another world hides beneath the tourist mask worn by China. This blog presents my attempts to avoid these cliches of travel. I want to see things before they are groomed; hear them before they are edited. Through direct observation I discover the realities of life in China. The Watchtower on the top of every page (my own photo) symbolises my carefully watchful approach. Welcome to China – first-hand…

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7 Comments »

  1. Does that mean that you’ll be knocking on my door, asking if I believe in god? (http://www.watchtower.org/)

    Comment by Max Hammond — 19 August 2006 @ 9:11 am | Reply

  2. Hello,

    This is exactly what I was searching for. Thank you. It’s amazing.

    Comment by Rebecca — 18 November 2006 @ 9:44 am | Reply

  3. Hello! Good Site! Thanks you! ynlmtbnxufq

    Comment by vcaoscbosu — 18 June 2007 @ 3:33 pm | Reply

  4. I would like to see a continuation of the topic

    Comment by Maximus — 20 December 2007 @ 10:13 am | Reply

  5. @Max Hammond.

    Have you ever listened to one of Jehovah’s Witnesses? I would almost be willing to bet that they have never knocked on your door to ask you if you believe in God.

    Comment by Nathan Cain — 22 February 2010 @ 2:16 am | Reply

  6. 當我們看中國的外交,卻發現她很多時會在違背自身價值觀和利益的情況下,向各國妥協。可見中國外交的失敗。

    中共所實行的睦鄰政策,可說是徹底的失敗。中共現在的領導人奉行鄧小平那套所謂的「韜光養晦」政策。但其實,這只是一種逃避挑戰的鴕鳥政策。當今中國所面臨的惡劣國際環境,則決定了這種鴕鳥政策必然失敗。

    在這種鴕鳥政策主導下,中國外交不僅畏首畏尾,更胸無大志,既沒有系統的外交戰略,也沒有長遠的外交目標。這種頭痛醫頭、腳痛醫腳式的外交政策,直接導致中國外交在面對各種挑釁時束手無策,盡顯軟弱之態,面對大好機遇時,也因毫無戰略準備而無所作為。

    對朝鮮對印度對日本甚至是越南,中國都是畏首畏尾,一昧退讓,實行韜光養晦。本來,鄧小平的韜光養晦,是指平時積蓄力量,關鍵時刻果斷出手,是一種積極進取的外交思維。但現在,卻成了一種鴕鳥政策,令人無奈。

    其實,按照中國現在的實力,根本不用如此讓步,中共對東南亞國家,對日本,甚至是越南朝鮮,都讓得太多。完全顯示不到大國風範,畏首畏尾的外交政策,只會令中國人蒙羞!

    至於對印度和越南的外交處理手法,中共簡直令人覺得恥辱。情況就好像當年清政府打贏法國,但仍然賠償法國一樣。令人覺得是絕大的恥辱。

    中國在和日本,越南,俄羅斯,印度等周遍強國的政治經濟往來中,沒有佔到多少便宜,也沒有讓這些列強放棄對中國崛起的偏見和敵視,自身利益不斷被侵占,不能不說中國的外交政策有很大缺陷,這是中國國家佈局計劃和外交政策慘敗的最佳體現。

    中國常常想成為一等一的大國,但他的外交卻事事以懦弱的方式勉強了事,實在不能給人任何強國的風範。

    Comment by vokoyo — 27 October 2011 @ 11:23 pm | Reply

    • See below the google translation for the comment above:

      When we look at China’s diplomacy, but found that she often would go against their own values ​​and interests in the case of the national compromise. Shows the failure of Chinese diplomacy.

      Good-neighborly policy practiced by the Chinese Communists can be said is a complete failure. Deng Xiaoping, Communist China’s leaders to pursue the set of so-called “low profile” policy. But in fact, it is only a challenge to avoid ostrich. China today faces the harsh international environment, the decision of this ostrich policy is bound to fail.

      In this ostrich policy under the guidance of China’s diplomacy not only timid, more ambition, neither the system of diplomatic strategy, and no long-term foreign policy objectives. This stop-gap type of foreign policy, a direct result of China’s diplomacy in the face of provocation helpless, weak and full of attitude, the face of great opportunities, but also because there is no strategy to prepare and do nothing.

      North Korea to India to Japan and even Vietnam and China are timid, reimbursing concessions, the implementation of keeping a low profile. Originally, Deng Xiaoping’s keeping a low profile, is usually a reserve force, the key moment of decisive shot, is an aggressive diplomatic thinking. But now, it has become a ostrich, frustrating.

      In fact, according to China’s current strength, there is no such concessions, the Chinese Communists on the Southeast Asian countries, Japan, Korea and even Vietnam are let too much. Show less than full power style, over-cautious foreign policy, will only make the Chinese people shame!

      As for India, and Vietnam’s diplomatic approach, Chinese people feel shame really. Situation is similar when the Qing government to win the French, but French is still the same compensation. It think it is great shame.

      China’s and Japan, Vietnam, Russia, India and other surrounding political and economic power exchanges, there is no accounting for much cheaper, not to give up these powers, the rise of China bias and hostility, self-interest continue to be occupied, can not say that the Chinese very flawed foreign policy, which is China’s national distribution plan and the best expression of foreign policy fiasco.

      China often want to be the number one power, but his diplomacy was reluctant to put the cowardly way of trouble, it can not give any power style.

      Comment by china1sthand — 30 October 2011 @ 6:13 pm | Reply


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